SQL MySQL for Data Analytics and Business Intelligence

SQL that will get you hired – SQL for Business Analysis, Marketing, and Data Management
SQL MySQL for Data Analytics and Business Intelligence
File Size :
4.23 GB
Total length :
11h 13m

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Instructor

365 Careers

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Last update

Last updated 9/2022

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4.6/5

SQL MySQL for Data Analytics and Business Intelligence

What you’ll learn

Become an expert in SQL
Learn how to code in SQL
Boost your resume by learning an in-demand skill
Create, design, and operate with SQL databases
Start using MySQL – the #1 Database Management System
Prepare for SQL developer, Database administrator, Business Analyst, and Business Intelligence job opportunities
Adopt professionally tested SQL best practices
Gain theoretical insights about relational databases
Work with a sophisticated real-life database throughout the course
Get maximum preparation for real-life database management
Add data analytical tools to your skillset
Develop business intuition while solving tasks with big data
Study relational database management theory that you will need in your workplace every day
Learn how to create a database from scratch
The ability to take control of your dataset – insert, update, and delete records from your database
Be confident while working with constraints and relating data tables
Become a proficient MySQL Workbench user
Acquire top-notch coding techniques and best practices
Know how to answer specific business questions by using SQL’s aggregate functions
Handle complex SQL joins with ease
Approach more advanced topics in programming like SQL’s triggers, sequences, local and global variables, indexes, and more
Merge coding skills and business acumen to solve complex analytical problems
Become a proficient SQL user by writing flawless and efficient queries
Tons of exercises that will solidify your knowledge
The freedom to query anything you like from a database

SQL MySQL for Data Analytics and Business Intelligence

Requirements

No prior experience is required. We will start from the very basics

Description

How important is database management in the age of big data and analytics?It is really important.    How many employers would be happy to hire employees who can use data for the purposes of business intelligence?   All of them.   How many people have these skills?Not enough.   This is why now is the time to learn SQL and gain a competitive advantage in the job market. Remember, the average salary of a SQL developer is $103,400! That’s a lucrative career.    How come?   Well, when you can work with SQL, it means you don’t have to rely on others sending you data and executing queries for you. You can do that on your own. This allows you to be independent and dig deeper into the data to obtain the answers to questions that might improve the way your company does its business. For instance, Database management is the foundation for data analysis and intelligent decision making.    Worried that you have no previous experience?  Not an issue. We will start from the very basics and gradually teach you everything you need to know. Step by step. With no steps skipped.    Why take this course in particular? Isn’t it like the rest of the SQL courses out there?   We would like to think it isn’t. Our team worked hard to create a course that is:

Easy to understand

Time efficient and concise

Shows how SQL can be crucial for data analytics and business intelligence   Comprehensive – it covers several topics not shown in other SQL courses    Practical – it teaches you how to work with a real-life database    Corresponds to professional best practices

Taught in MySQL – The most popular SQL database management system

Contains plenty of downloadable exercises, course notes, and quiz questions   Some of these aspects have been covered in other courses. Others haven’t. However, no one provides such a variety of topics in one place.    We firmly believe this course is the best training material out there. It is a truly interactive experience preparing you for a real-life working environment.    We love teaching   So far, over 1,750,000 students have taken our courses here on Udemy. Teaching is what we do best, and we take pride in going the extra mile to create the most engaging content for you, our students. Our mission is to help you bridge the gap between theoretical knowledge taught at school and in universities and the practical application required at the workplace.    So, why do you need to enroll in this course and learn SQL?

Salary/Income. As we pointed out earlier, learning SQL is a great opportunity. There is a significant surge in demand for skills revolving around database management, database administration, and business analysis relying on data. Companies will pay top dollars for specialists who have such know-how

Profession of the future. In the years to come, data will only grow in importance and size. Therefore, it is great to pick up a skill that will likely increase in demand over the years to come

Analytical reasoning. Programming languages are a great way to train your mind. Furthermore, understanding a business task and looking for its solution through writing code can be really interesting and stimulating once you become familiar with the basics   What about certificates? Do you provide a certificate?Upon completion of the course, you will be able to download a certificate of completion with your name on it. Then, you can upload this certificate on LinkedIn and show potential employers this is a skill you possess.   Sounds awesome, right?   So, what are you waiting for? Click the “Buy now” button, and let’s begin this journey together!

Overview

Section 1: Introduction to databases, SQL, and MySQL

Lecture 1 What does the course cover?

Lecture 2 Why SQL?

Lecture 3 Why MySQL?

Lecture 4 Introduction to databases

Section 2: SQL theory

Lecture 5 SQL as a declarative language

Lecture 6 Data definition language (DDL)

Lecture 7 SQL keywords

Lecture 8 Data manipulation language (DML)

Lecture 9 Data control language (DCL)

Lecture 10 Transaction control language (TCL)

Section 3: Basic database terminology

Lecture 11 Relational database essentials

Lecture 12 Databases vs spreadsheets

Lecture 13 Database terminology

Lecture 14 Relational schemas – Primary key

Lecture 15 Relational schemas – Foreign key

Lecture 16 Relational schemas – Unique key and null values

Lecture 17 Relationships

Section 4: Installing MySQL and getting acquainted with the interface

Lecture 18 Installing MySQL

Lecture 19 Additional note – Installing – Visual C

Lecture 20 Installing MySQL on macOS and Unix systems

Lecture 21 The Client-Server Model

Lecture 22 Setting up a connection

Lecture 23 Read me!!!

Lecture 24 New Authentication Plugin – Creating a New User

Lecture 25 Introduction to the MySQL interface

Section 5: First steps in SQL

Lecture 26 Creating a Database – Part I

Lecture 27 SQL files

Lecture 28 Creating a Database – Part I – exercise

Lecture 29 Creating a Database – Part I – solution

Lecture 30 Creating a Database – Part II

Lecture 31 Creating a Database – Part II – exercise

Lecture 32 Creating a Database – Part II – solution

Lecture 33 Introduction to data types

Lecture 34 String data types

Lecture 35 Integers

Lecture 36 Fixed and floating-point data types

Lecture 37 Other useful data types

Lecture 38 Creating a table

Lecture 39 Creating a table – exercise

Lecture 40 Creating a table – solution

Lecture 41 Using databases and tables

Lecture 42 Using databases and tables – exercise

Lecture 43 Using databases and tables – solution

Lecture 44 Additional notes on using tables

Lecture 45 Additional notes on using tables – exercise

Section 6: MySQL constraints

Lecture 46 PRIMARY KEY constraint

Lecture 47 PRIMARY KEY constraint – exercise

Lecture 48 PRIMARY KEY constraint – solution

Lecture 49 FOREIGN KEY constraint – Part I

Lecture 50 FOREIGN KEY constraint – Part II

Lecture 51 FOREIGN KEY constraint – Part II – exercise

Lecture 52 FOREIGN KEY constraint – Part II – solution

Lecture 53 UNIQUE Constraint

Lecture 54 UNIQUE Constraint – exercise

Lecture 55 DEFAULT Constraint

Lecture 56 DEFAULT Constraint – exercise

Lecture 57 DEFAULT Constraint – solution

Lecture 58 NOT NULL Constraint – Part I

Lecture 59 NOT NULL Constraint – Part I – exercise

Lecture 60 NOT NULL Constraint – Part I – solution

Lecture 61 NOT NULL Constraint – Part II

Section 7: SQL best practices

Lecture 62 Coding techniques and best practices – Part I

Lecture 63 Coding techniques and best practices – Part II

Section 8: Loading the ’employees’ database

Lecture 64 Loading the ’employees’ database

Lecture 65 Loading the ’employees’ database

Section 9: SQL SELECT statement

Lecture 66 SELECT – FROM

Lecture 67 SELECT – FROM – exercise

Lecture 68 SELECT – FROM – solution

Lecture 69 WHERE

Lecture 70 WHERE – exercise

Lecture 71 WHERE – solution

Lecture 72 AND

Lecture 73 AND – exercise

Lecture 74 AND – solution

Lecture 75 OR

Lecture 76 OR – exercise

Lecture 77 OR – solution

Lecture 78 Operator precedence

Lecture 79 Operator precedence – exercise

Lecture 80 Operator precedence – solution

Lecture 81 IN – NOT IN

Lecture 82 IN – NOT IN – exercise 1

Lecture 83 IN – NOT IN – solution 1

Lecture 84 IN – NOT IN – exercise 2

Lecture 85 IN – NOT IN – solution 2

Lecture 86 LIKE – NOT LIKE

Lecture 87 LIKE – NOT LIKE – exercise

Lecture 88 LIKE – NOT LIKE – solution

Lecture 89 Wildcard characters

Lecture 90 Wildcard characters – exercise

Lecture 91 Wildcard characters – solution

Lecture 92 BETWEEN – AND

Lecture 93 BETWEEN – AND – exercise

Lecture 94 BETWEEN – AND- solution

Lecture 95 IS NOT NULL – IS NULL

Lecture 96 IS NOT NULL – IS NULL – exercise

Lecture 97 IS NOT NULL – IS NULL – solution

Lecture 98 Other comparison operators

Lecture 99 Other comparison operators – exercise

Lecture 100 Other comparison operators – solution

Lecture 101 SELECT DISTINCT

Lecture 102 SELECT DISTINCT – exercise

Lecture 103 SELECT DISTINCT – solution

Lecture 104 Introduction to aggregate functions

Lecture 105 Introduction to aggregate functions – exercise

Lecture 106 Introduction to aggregate functions – solution

Lecture 107 ORDER BY

Lecture 108 ORDER BY – exercise

Lecture 109 ORDER BY – solution

Lecture 110 GROUP BY

Lecture 111 Using Aliases (AS)

Lecture 112 Using Aliases (AS) – exercise

Lecture 113 Using Aliases (AS) – solution

Lecture 114 HAVING

Lecture 115 HAVING – exercise

Lecture 116 HAVING – solution

Lecture 117 WHERE vs HAVING- Part I

Lecture 118 WHERE vs HAVING- Part II

Lecture 119 WHERE vs HAVING – Part II – exercise

Lecture 120 WHERE vs HAVING – Part II – solution

Lecture 121 LIMIT

Lecture 122 LIMIT – exercise

Lecture 123 LIMIT – solution

Section 10: SQL INSERT statement

Lecture 124 The INSERT statement – Part I

Lecture 125 The INSERT statement – Part II

Lecture 126 The INSERT statement – exercise 1

Lecture 127 The INSERT statement – solution 1

Lecture 128 The INSERT statement – exercise 2

Lecture 129 The INSERT statement – solution 2

Lecture 130 Inserting data INTO a new table

Lecture 131 Inserting Data INTO a New Table – exercise

Lecture 132 Inserting Data INTO a New Table – solution

Section 11: SQL UPDATE Statement

Lecture 133 TCL’s COMMIT and ROLLBACK

Lecture 134 The UPDATE Statement – Part I

Lecture 135 ROLLBACK; ARTICLE

Lecture 136 The UPDATE Statement – Part II

Lecture 137 The UPDATE Statement – Part II – exercise

Lecture 138 The UPDATE Statement – Part II – solution

Section 12: SQL DELETE Statement

Lecture 139 The DELETE Statement – Part I

Lecture 140 The DELETE Statement – Part II

Lecture 141 The DELETE Statement – Part II – exercise

Lecture 142 The DELETE Statement – Part II – solution

Lecture 143 DROP vs TRUNCATE vs DELETE

Section 13: MySQL – Aggregate functions

Lecture 144 COUNT()

Lecture 145 COUNT() – exercise

Lecture 146 COUNT() – solution

Lecture 147 SUM()

Lecture 148 SUM() – exercise

Lecture 149 SUM() – solution

Lecture 150 MIN() and MAX()

Lecture 151 MIN() and MAX() – exercise

Lecture 152 MIN() and MAX() – solution

Lecture 153 AVG()

Lecture 154 AVG() – exercise

Lecture 155 AVG() – solution

Lecture 156 ROUND()

Lecture 157 ROUND() – exercise

Lecture 158 ROUND() – solution

Lecture 159 COALESCE() – Preamble

Lecture 160 IFNULL() and COALESCE()

Lecture 161 Another Example of Using COALESCE()

Lecture 162 Another example of using COALESCE() – exercise 1

Lecture 163 Another example of using COALESCE() – solution 1

Lecture 164 Another example of using COALESCE() – exercise 2

Lecture 165 Another example of using COALESCE() – solution 2

Section 14: SQL Joins

Lecture 166 Introduction to JOINs

Lecture 167 Intro to JOINs – exercise 1

Lecture 168 Intro to JOINs – solution 1

Lecture 169 Intro to JOINs – exercise 2

Lecture 170 INNER JOIN – Part I

Lecture 171 INNER JOIN – Part II

Lecture 172 INNER JOIN – Part II – exercise

Lecture 173 INNER JOIN – Part II – solution

Lecture 174 A Note on Using Joins

Lecture 175 Duplicate Records

Lecture 176 LEFT JOIN – Part I

Lecture 177 LEFT JOIN – Part II

Lecture 178 LEFT JOIN – Part II – exercise

Lecture 179 LEFT JOIN – Part II – solution

Lecture 180 RIGHT JOIN

Lecture 181 The new and the old join syntax

Lecture 182 The new and the old join syntax – exercise

Lecture 183 The new and the old join syntax – solution

Lecture 184 JOIN and WHERE Used Together

Lecture 185 Important – Prevent Error Code: 1055!

Lecture 186 JOIN and WHERE Used Together – exercise

Lecture 187 JOIN and WHERE Used Together – solution

Lecture 188 CROSS JOIN

Lecture 189 CROSS JOIN – exercise 1

Lecture 190 CROSS JOIN – solution 1

Lecture 191 CROSS JOIN – exercise 2

Lecture 192 CROSS JOIN – solution 2

Lecture 193 Using Aggregate Functions with Joins

Lecture 194 JOIN more than two tables in SQL

Lecture 195 Join more than two tables in SQL – exercise

Lecture 196 Join more than two tables in SQL – solution

Lecture 197 Tips and tricks for joins

Lecture 198 Tips and tricks for joins – exercise

Lecture 199 Tips and tricks for joins – solution

Lecture 200 UNION vs UNION ALL

Lecture 201 UNION vs UNION ALL – exercise

Lecture 202 UNION vs UNION ALL – solution

Section 15: SQL Subqueries

Lecture 203 SQL Subqueries with IN nested inside WHERE

Lecture 204 SQL Subqueries with IN nested inside WHERE – exercise

Lecture 205 SQL Subqueries with IN nested inside WHERE – solution

Lecture 206 SQL Subqueries with EXISTS-NOT EXISTS nested inside WHERE

Lecture 207 SQL Subqueries with EXISTS-NOT EXISTS nested inside WHERE – exercise

Lecture 208 SQL Subqueries with EXISTS-NOT EXISTS nested inside WHERE – solution

Lecture 209 SQL Subqueries nested in SELECT and FROM

Lecture 210 SQL Subqueries nested in SELECT and FROM – exercise 1

Lecture 211 SQL Subqueries nested in SELECT and FROM – solution 1

Lecture 212 SQL Subqueries nested in SELECT and FROM – exercise 2

Lecture 213 SQL Subqueries nested in SELECT and FROM – solution 2

Section 16: SQL Self Join

Lecture 214 Self Join

Section 17: SQL Views

Lecture 215 Views

Lecture 216 Views – exercise

Lecture 217 Views – solution

Section 18: Stored routines

Lecture 218 Introduction to stored routines

Lecture 219 The MySQL syntax for stored procedures

Lecture 220 Stored procedures – Example – Part I

Lecture 221 Stored procedures – Example – Part II

Lecture 222 Stored procedures – Example – Part II – exercise

Lecture 223 Stored procedures – Example – Part II – solution

Lecture 224 Another way to create a procedure

Lecture 225 Stored procedures with an input parameter

Lecture 226 Stored procedures with an output parameter

Lecture 227 Stored procedures with an output parameter – exercise

Lecture 228 Stored procedures with an output parameter – solution

Lecture 229 Variables

Lecture 230 Variables – exercise

Lecture 231 Variables – solution

Lecture 232 User-defined functions in MySQL

Lecture 233 Error Code: 1418.

Lecture 234 User-defined functions in MySQL – exercise

Lecture 235 User-defined functions in MySQL – solution

Lecture 236 Stored routines – conclusion

Section 19: Advanced SQL Topics

Lecture 237 Types of MySQL Variables – Local Variables

Lecture 238 Session Variables

Lecture 239 Global Variables

Lecture 240 User-Defined vs System Variables

Lecture 241 MySQL Triggers

Lecture 242 MySQL Triggers

Lecture 243 MySQL Triggers – exercise

Lecture 244 MySQL Triggers – solution

Lecture 245 MySQL Indexes

Lecture 246 MySQL Indexes – exercise 1

Lecture 247 MySQL Indexes – solution 1

Lecture 248 MySQL Indexes – exercise 2

Lecture 249 MySQL Indexes – solution 2

Lecture 250 The CASE Statement

Lecture 251 The CASE Statement – exercise 1

Lecture 252 The CASE Statement – solution 1

Lecture 253 The CASE Statement – exercise 2

Lecture 254 The CASE Statement – solution 2

Lecture 255 The CASE Statement – exercise 3

Lecture 256 The CASE Statement – solution 3

Section 20: SQL Window Functions

Lecture 257 Introduction to MySQL Window Functions

Lecture 258 The ROW_NUMBER() Ranking Window Function and the Relevant MySQL Syntax

Lecture 259 The ROW_NUMBER() Ranking Window Function – Exercises

Lecture 260 The ROW_NUMBER() Ranking Window Function – Solution

Lecture 261 A Note on Using Several Window Functions in a Query

Lecture 262 A Note on Using Several Window Functions – Exercise

Lecture 263 A Note on Using Several Window Functions – Solution

Lecture 264 MySQL Window Functions Syntax

Lecture 265 MySQL Window Functions Syntax – Exercise

Lecture 266 MySQL Window Functions Syntax – Solution

Lecture 267 The PARTITION BY Clause VS the GROUP BY Clause

Lecture 268 The PARTITION BY Clause VS the GROUP BY Clause – Exercise

Lecture 269 The PARTITION BY Clause VS the GROUP BY Clause – Solution

Lecture 270 The MySQL RANK() and DENSE_RANK() Window Functions

Lecture 271 The MySQL RANK() and DENSE_RANK() Window Functions – Exercise

Lecture 272 The MySQL RANK() and DENSE_RANK() Window Functions – Solution

Lecture 273 Working with MySQL Ranking Window Functions and Joins Together

Lecture 274 Working with MySQL Ranking Window Functions and Joins Together – Exercise

Lecture 275 Working with MySQL Ranking Window Functions and Joins Together – Solution

Lecture 276 The LAG() and LEAD() Value Window Functions

Lecture 277 The LAG() and LEAD() Value Window Functions – Exercise

Lecture 278 The LAG() and LEAD() Value Window Functions – Solution

Lecture 279 MySQL Aggregate Functions in the Context of Window Functions – Part I

Lecture 280 MySQL Aggregate Functions in the Context of Window Functions – Part I-Exercise

Lecture 281 MySQL Aggregate Functions in the Context of Window Functions – Part I-Solution

Lecture 282 MySQL Aggregate Functions in the Context of Window Functions – Part II

Lecture 283 MySQL Aggregate Functions in the Context of Window Functions – Part II-Exercise

Lecture 284 MySQL Aggregate Functions in the Context of Window Functions – Part II-Solution

Section 21: Combining SQL and Tableau – Introduction

Lecture 285 The Advantages of Software Integration

Lecture 286 Why Combining SQL and Tableau is useful

Lecture 287 Installing Tableau Public

Lecture 288 Loading the ’employees_mod’ Database

Lecture 289 Loading the ’employees_mod’ Database

Section 22: Combining SQL and Tableau – Task 1

Lecture 290 Task 1

Lecture 291 Task 1 – Text

Lecture 292 Important clarification!

Lecture 293 Task 1: SQL Solution

Lecture 294 Task 1: SQL Solution – Code

Lecture 295 Transferring a Dataset from SQL to Tableau

Lecture 296 Chart 1: Visualizing and Analyzing the Solution in Tableau – Part I

Lecture 297 Chart 1: Visualizing and Analyzing the Solution in Tableau – Part II

Section 23: Combining SQL and Tableau – Task 2

Lecture 298 Task 2

Lecture 299 Task 2 – Text

Lecture 300 Task 2: SQL Solution

Lecture 301 Task 2: SQL Solution – Code

Lecture 302 Chart 2: Visualizing and Analyzing the Solution in Tableau

Section 24: Combining SQL and Tableau – Task 3

Lecture 303 Task 3

Lecture 304 Task 3 – Text

Lecture 305 Task 3: SQL Solution

Lecture 306 Task 3: SQL Solution – Code

Lecture 307 Chart 3: Visualizing and Analyzing the Solution in Tableau

Section 25: Combining SQL and Tableau – Task 4

Lecture 308 Task 4

Lecture 309 Task 4 – Text

Lecture 310 Task 4: Solution in SQL

Lecture 311 Task 4: Solution in SQL – Code

Lecture 312 Chart 4: Visualizing and Analyzing the Solution in Tableau

Section 26: Combining SQL and Tableau – Task 5

Lecture 313 Task 5: Organizing Charts 1-4 into a Beautiful Dashboard using Tableau

Section 27: Practice SQL – 10 Final Query Questions

Lecture 314 Practice SQL – 10 Final Query Questions

Section 28: BONUS LECTURE

Lecture 315 Bonus Lecture: Next Steps

People interested in SQL developer, Database administrator, Business Analyst, and Business Intelligence job opportunities,Beginners to programming,Everyone who wants to learn how to code and apply their skills in practice

Course Information:

Udemy | English | 11h 13m | 4.23 GB
Created by: 365 Careers

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