Thermodynamics for Engineering Students

A Detailed Introduction to Thermodynamics
Thermodynamics for Engineering Students
File Size :
20.99 GB
Total length :
19h 18m

Instructor

Cherish Qualls, PhD

Language

Last update

Last updated 12/2019

Ratings

4.5/5

Thermodynamics for Engineering Students

What you’ll learn

Utilize the concepts of work and energy to evaluate control volumes as well as closed systems
Steam tables, entropy, enthalpy and more!

Thermodynamics for Engineering Students

Requirements

Be able to use dervatives and integrals from Calculus
Be able to draw free body diagrams of simple systems

Description

What is Thermodynamics? Thermo is the branch of physics that deals with temperature and  pressure and how they are related to work and energy.   Thermodynamics  applies to a wide variety of applications such as combustion engines,  heating and air conditioning systems, and jet propulsion, along with many, many others. Who should enroll in this course? Engineering students wanting to get a head start on an upcoming Thermo courseStudents currently taking Thermo who need extra examples and explanationsStudents and professionals who are preparing to take the Fundamentals of Engineering ExamAnyone with an interest in learning about work and energy  How’s this course different from the other online Thermo courses? Why should I enroll in this course? This course covers all the topics needed to gain an understanding of the basics of thermodynamics.  We will cover: Pressure and temperatureWork and energy of closed systemsSteam TablesEnthalpyCompressibility chartsIdeal gas modelMass flow ratesWork and energy of control volumesThermodynamic efficienciesEntropyAnd more!What sets this course apart from others is the number of worked  examples.  Being an instructor of Thermodynamics for many years, I  understand the need for examples.  So many instructors simply show a  solution to a problem or only solve it halfway and just assume the  student knows how to finish it.  This used to be one of my biggest  frustrations as a student so I can relate when I hear today’s students  complain about this.  To prevent this frustration, this course has many,  many fully-worked example problems in a range of difficulty levels. I also don’t assume you know more than you do.  We start with the basics and work our way up to more complex material.Now, what good is learning material if you can’t check your understanding, right?  To assist with this, quiz problems are provided  throughout the course.  To check your work, video solutions of each quiz are provided. In addition, the outline of the notes I use in the videos is provided as a downloadable file to help you follow along during the  course. Will the material taught  prepare me for other courses? The relationships between pressure, temperature, density, work and energy are fundamental to so many areas.  As such, this course will prepare you for more advanced topics like CombustionHeat transferFluid mechanicsPropulsionAerodynamicsAnd many others How’s the course structured and what prior knowledge is needed?  Do I need a book? You will have handwritten lectures followed by fully worked examples.  There are NO PowerPoint slides used in this course.  From my experience  students learn best when following along and writing the notes versus  just listening to someone talk while staring at a bunch of slides.  And of course, throughout the class you will have the opportunity to test your knowledge using quizzes. The examples we cover do use basic concepts from Calculus such as  derivatives and integrals.  In order to understand the material and  examples you should know these concepts. As for the textbook, I will be using the 8th Edition of Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics  by Moran, Shapiro, Boettner, and Bailey.  ISBN: 978-1118412930.   Although not required, this book is a great resource and I strongly  encourage you to get a copy for yourself.  We will be covering the first  6 chapters of this text.    What are you waiting for? There’s no better time than now to get started. Enroll today!

Overview

Section 1: Chapter 1 – Introduction

Lecture 1 Welcome Video

Lecture 2 1.1 Introduction and Downloadable Files

Lecture 3 1.2 Units and Examples

Lecture 4 1.3 Specific Volume and Pressure

Lecture 5 1.4 Pressure Devices and Gage Pressure

Lecture 6 Quiz 1

Lecture 7 1.5 Temperature

Lecture 8 1.6 Example 2 and Example 3

Lecture 9 Quiz 1 Version 2

Section 2: Chapter 2 – Work and Energy

Lecture 10 2.1 Kinetic and Potential Energy

Lecture 11 2.2 Example 4

Lecture 12 2.3 Understanding Work

Lecture 13 2.4 Example 5

Lecture 14 2.5 Example 6

Lecture 15 Quiz 2 Version 1

Lecture 16 Quiz 2 Version 2

Lecture 17 2.6 Heat Transfer

Lecture 18 2.7 Energy Balance

Lecture 19 2.8 Example 7

Lecture 20 2.9 Example 8

Lecture 21 Quiz 3 Version 1

Lecture 22 Quiz 3 Version 2

Lecture 23 2.10 Cycles

Lecture 24 2.11 Example 9

Lecture 25 Quiz 4 Version 1

Lecture 26 Quiz 4 Version 2

Section 3: Chapter 3 – Evaluating Properties

Lecture 27 3.1 Evaluating Properties

Lecture 28 3.2 Phase Change

Lecture 29 3.3 Intro to Steam Tables and Linear Interpolation

Lecture 30 3.4 Steam Tables and Quality

Lecture 31 3.5 Example 10

Lecture 32 3.6 Example 11

Lecture 33 3.7 Example 12

Lecture 34 3.8 Example 13

Lecture 35 Quiz 5 Version 1

Lecture 36 Quiz 5 Version 2

Lecture 37 3.9 Enthalpy and Specific Heat

Lecture 38 3.10 Example 14

Lecture 39 3.11 Property Approximation

Lecture 40 3.12 Compressibility Chart, Ideal Gas and Example 15

Lecture 41 3.13 Ideal Gas

Lecture 42 3.14 Example 16

Lecture 43 3.15 Example 17

Lecture 44 3.16 Polytropic Process and Ideal Gas

Lecture 45 3.17 Example 18

Lecture 46 Quiz 6 Version 1

Lecture 47 Quiz 6 Version 2

Section 4: Chapter 4 – Control Volume Analysis

Lecture 48 4.1 Conservation of Mass

Lecture 49 4.2 Example 19

Lecture 50 4.3 Example 20

Lecture 51 4.4 Example 21

Lecture 52 Quiz 7 Version 1

Lecture 53 Quiz 7 Version 2

Lecture 54 4.5 Conservation of Energy and Steady State

Lecture 55 4.6 Example 22

Lecture 56 Quiz 8 Version 2

Lecture 57 4.7 Example 23

Lecture 58 4.8 Nozzles and Diffusers

Lecture 59 4.9 Example 24

Lecture 60 4.10 Turbines and Example 25

Lecture 61 Quiz 8 Version 1

Lecture 62 Quiz 8 Version 3

Lecture 63 4.11 Compressors, Pumps, and Example 26

Lecture 64 4.12 Heat Exchanger and Example 27

Lecture 65 Quiz 8 Version 4

Lecture 66 4.13 Throttling Device and Example 28

Lecture 67 4.14 Example 29

Section 5: Chapter 5 – Second Law of Thermodynamics

Lecture 68 5.1 Intro to 2nd Law of Thermo

Lecture 69 5.2 2nd Law of Thermo with Cycles

Lecture 70 Quiz 9 Version 1

Lecture 71 Quiz 9 Version 2

Lecture 72 5.3 Max Performance Equations

Lecture 73 5.4 Example 30

Lecture 74 5.5 Example 31

Lecture 75 5.6 Carnot Cycle

Lecture 76 5.7 Example 32 Part 1

Lecture 77 5.8 Example 32 Part 2

Lecture 78 Quiz 10 Version 1

Lecture 79 5.9 Clausius Inequality and Example 33

Section 6: Chapter 6 – Entropy

Lecture 80 6.1 Intro to Entropy

Lecture 81 6.2 Intro to Entropy Part 2

Lecture 82 6.3 Example 34

Lecture 83 6.4 Example 35

Lecture 84 6.5 Entropy Change in Closed Systems

Lecture 85 6.6 Example 36

Lecture 86 6.7 Entropy Balance of Closed Systems

Lecture 87 6.8 Example 37

Lecture 88 Quiz 11 Version 1

Lecture 89 6.9 Entropy and Control Volumes and Example 38

Lecture 90 Quiz 11 Version 2

Lecture 91 6.10 Isentropic Process

Lecture 92 6.11 Example 39

Lecture 93 Quiz 11 Version 3

Beginner engineering students. This course is equivalent to an introductory Thermodynamics course.,Anyone interested in learning about the relationships between pressure, temperature, and fluid flow

Course Information:

Udemy | English | 19h 18m | 20.99 GB
Created by: Cherish Qualls, PhD

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